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Trampolines are soaring in popularity. From backyard trampolines to trampoline-themed recreation centers, children and teens are bouncing up and down to have fun and also to get a bit of exercise. But with all that jumping going on, some children get hurt.

Thousands of people are injured on trampolines each year, with children younger than 6 years being at the greatest risk. Most injuries happen right on the trampoline itself, not from falling off of the trampoline. Common injuries include:

  • Broken bones (some requiring surgery)
  • Concussions and other head injuries
  • Sprains and strains
  • Bruises, scrapes, and cuts
  • Head and neck injuries (which can lead to permanent paralysis or death)

The American Academy of Pediatrics does not recommend trampolines be purchased for home use.

However, if you have a home trampoline, be sure to follow these safety guidelines:

  1. Supervise children on trampolines at all times.
  2. Only allow one person at a time to jump. Most injuries occur when there are two or more jumpers, especially when some are larger than others.
  3. Children under the age of six should not jump on full-size trampolines. Don’t allow jumpers to attempt somersaults or flips.
  4. Be sure springs and hard edges are covered with padding, use a safety net and keep trampolines away from trees or other structures.
  5. Check all equipment often. Protective padding, the net enclosure, and any other parts should be repaired or replaced as needed.

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